Allo' Expat Nicaragua - Connecting Expats in Nicaragua
Main Homepage
Allo' Expat Nicaragua Logo


Subscribe to Allo' Expat Newsletter
 
Check our Rates
   Information Center Nicaragua
Nicaragua General Information
 
History of Nicaragua
Nicaragua Culture
Nicaragua Cuisine
Nicaragua Geography
Nicaragua Population
Nicaragua Government
Nicaragua Economy
Nicaragua Communications
Nicaragua Transportations
Nicaragua Military
Nicaragua Transnational Issues
Nicaragua Healthcare
Nicaragua People, Language & Religion
Nicaragua Expatriates Handbook
Nicaragua and Foreign Government
Nicaragua General Listings
Nicaragua Useful Tips
Nicaragua Education & Medical
Nicaragua Travel & Tourism Info
Nicaragua Lifestyle & Leisure
Nicaragua Business Matters
  Sponsored Links


Check our Rates

People, Languages & Religions in Nicaragua
user warning: Duplicate entry '501244' for key 1 query: INSERT INTO latvia_accesslog (title, path, url, hostname, uid, sid, timer, timestamp) values('Latvia Bar, Club & Nightlife Guide', 'taxonomy/term/12', 'http://www.latvia.alloexpat.com/', '207.241.237.224', 0, 'b4760911c3d25d6251a466d99663fa2b', 458, 1428100455) in /home/alloexpa/public_html/easterneurope/includes/database.mysql.inc on line 172.
 
 
 

People

The majority of the Nicaraguan population, (86% or approximately 4.8 million people), is either Mestizo or White. 69% are Mestizos (mixed Amerindian and White) and 17% are White with the majority being of Spanish, German, Italian or French ancestry. Mestizos and Whites mainly reside in the western region of the country.

About 9% of Nicaragua's population is black, or Afro-Nicaragüense, and mainly reside on the country's sparsely populated Caribbean or Atlantic coast. The black population is mostly composed of black English-speaking Creoles who are the descendents of escaped or shipwrecked slaves; many carry the name of Scottish settlers who brought slaves with them, such as Campbell, Gordon, Downs and Hodgeson. Although many Creoles supported Somoza because of his close association with the US, they rallied to the Sandinista cause in July 1979 only to reject the revolution soon afterwards in response to a new phase of 'mestizoisation' and imposition of central rule from Managua. Nicaragua has the largest Afro Latin American population in Central America with the second largest percentage. There is also a smaller number of Garifuna, a people of mixed Carib and Arawak descent. In the mid-1980s, the government divided the department of Zelaya – consisting of the eastern half of the country – into two autonomous regions and granted the black and indigenous people of this region limited self-rule within the Republic.

The remaining 5% of Nicaraguans are Amerindians, the unmixed descendants of the country's indigenous inhabitants. Nicaragua's pre-Columbian population consisted of many indigenous groups. In the western region the Nicarao people, after whom the country is named, were present along with other groups related by culture and language to the Mayans. The Caribbean coast of Nicaragua was inhabited by indigenous peoples who were mostly chibcha related groups that had migrated from South America, primarily present day Colombia and Venezuela. These groups include the Miskitos, Ramas and Sumos. In the 19th century, there was a substantial indigenous minority, but this group was also largely assimilated culturally into the mestizo majority.

Languages

Central American Spanish is spoken by about 90% of the country's population. In Nicaragua, the Voseo form is common, as also in Argentina, Uruguay and coastal Colombia. In the Caribbean coast many Afro-Nicaraguans and creoles speak English and creole English as their first language. Also in the Caribbean coast, many Indigenous people speak their native languages, such as the Miskito, Sumo, Rama and Garifuna language. In addition, many ethnic groups in Nicaragua have maintained their ancestral languages, while also speaking Spanish or English; these include Chinese, Arabic, German and Italian.

Nicaragua was home to three extinct languages, one of which was never classified. Nicaraguan Sign language is also of particular interest to linguists.

Religions

Religion is a significant part of the culture of Nicaragua and is referred to in the constitution. Religious freedom, which has been guaranteed since 1939 and religious tolerance are promoted by both the Nicaraguan government and the constitution.

Nicaragua has no official religion. However, Catholic Bishops are expected to lend their authority to important state occasions, and their pronouncements on national issues are closely followed. They can also be called upon to mediate between contending parties at moments of political crisis.


See more information on the next page... (next)


 

 
 
   



 


copyrights © AlloExpat.com
2015 | Policy